Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104: H4

A. Nagy, Yunfeng Xu, Gary R. Bauchan, Daniel R. Shelton, Xiangwu Nou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-51
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume229
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 16 2016

Fingerprint

Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli
fresh produce
fimbriae
Escherichia coli
Biofilms
Shiga Toxin
Spinacia oleracea
biofilm
Intestines
Disease Outbreaks
Shiga toxin
Agglomeration
Cell Aggregation
spinach
Gene encoding
Genes
Adsorption
intestines
Virulence

Keywords

  • Aggregation
  • Aggregative adherence fimbriae
  • Biofilms
  • Colonization
  • E. coli O104:H4
  • Enteroaggregative E. coli
  • Fresh produce

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104 : H4. / Nagy, A.; Xu, Yunfeng; Bauchan, Gary R.; Shelton, Daniel R.; Nou, Xiangwu.

In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, Vol. 229, 16.07.2016, p. 44-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f3b7af9854cf4d3787dbd72b61eed050,
title = "Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104: H4",
abstract = "The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce.",
keywords = "Aggregation, Aggregative adherence fimbriae, Biofilms, Colonization, E. coli O104:H4, Enteroaggregative E. coli, Fresh produce",
author = "A. Nagy and Yunfeng Xu and Bauchan, {Gary R.} and Shelton, {Daniel R.} and Xiangwu Nou",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2016.04.007",
language = "English",
volume = "229",
pages = "44--51",
journal = "International Journal of Food Microbiology",
issn = "0168-1605",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104

T2 - H4

AU - Nagy, A.

AU - Xu, Yunfeng

AU - Bauchan, Gary R.

AU - Shelton, Daniel R.

AU - Nou, Xiangwu

PY - 2016/7/16

Y1 - 2016/7/16

N2 - The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce.

AB - The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce.

KW - Aggregation

KW - Aggregative adherence fimbriae

KW - Biofilms

KW - Colonization

KW - E. coli O104:H4

KW - Enteroaggregative E. coli

KW - Fresh produce

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84963721996&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84963721996&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2016.04.007

DO - 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2016.04.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 27099984

AN - SCOPUS:84963721996

VL - 229

SP - 44

EP - 51

JO - International Journal of Food Microbiology

JF - International Journal of Food Microbiology

SN - 0168-1605

ER -