Affective temperaments, as measured by TEMPS-A, among nonviolent suicide attempters

Annamaria Rihmer, S. Rózsa, Z. Ríhmer, X. Gonda, Kareen K. Akiskal, Hagop S. Akiskal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of affective temperaments in suicidal behavior. Method: Using the standardized Hungarian version of the full-scale 110-item version of the TEMPS-A autoquestionnaire we compared the affective temperament-profiles of 150 consecutively investigated nonviolent suicide attempters (106 females and 44 males) and 302 age, sex and education matched normal controls (216 females and 86 males). Results: Compared to controls, both female and male suicide attempters scored significantly higher in the four of the five affective temperaments, containing more or less depressive component (depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious). On the other hand, however, no significant difference between the suicide attempters and controls was found for the hyperthymic temperament. Significantly higher rate of suicide attempters (90.0%) than controls (21.5%) have had some kind of dominant (mean score + 2SD or above) affective temperament. Compared to controls, depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperaments were significantly more frequent and hyperthymic temperament was nonsignificantly less common among suicide attempters. Conclusions: The findings support the strong relationship between depression and suicidal behavior even on temperamental level, and suggest that hyperthymic temperament does not have predisposing role for suicidal behavior at least in the case of nonviolent suicide attempters. Limitation: As only nonviolent suicide attempters were studied, our findings should pertain only for this patient-population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume116
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009

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Temperament
Suicide
Sex Education
Depression

Keywords

  • Affective temperaments
  • Depression
  • Personality
  • Suicide attempters
  • TEMPS-A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Affective temperaments, as measured by TEMPS-A, among nonviolent suicide attempters. / Rihmer, Annamaria; Rózsa, S.; Ríhmer, Z.; Gonda, X.; Akiskal, Kareen K.; Akiskal, Hagop S.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 116, No. 1-2, 07.2009, p. 18-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rihmer, Annamaria ; Rózsa, S. ; Ríhmer, Z. ; Gonda, X. ; Akiskal, Kareen K. ; Akiskal, Hagop S. / Affective temperaments, as measured by TEMPS-A, among nonviolent suicide attempters. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2009 ; Vol. 116, No. 1-2. pp. 18-22.
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