Affective temperamental profiles are associated with white matter hyperintensity and suicidal risk in patients with mood disorders

Gianluca Serafini, Maurizio Pompili, Marco Innamorati, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Hagop S. Akiskal, Zoltan Rihmer, David Lester, Andrea Romano, Irismar Reis De Oliveira, Leonardo Strusi, Stefano Ferracuti, Paolo Girardi, Roberto Tatarelli

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65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Patients with white matter hyperintensities (WMH) may be at higher risk for affective disorders and suicide. Affective temperaments may play a significant role in mood disorders. This study aimed to evaluate the eventual association between WMH, affective temperaments and suicidal behaviour in major affective disorder. Methods: A total of 318 patients with major affective disorders were consecutively admitted as psychiatric inpatient. A total of 247 were included and given, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS 17), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS-A). Results: A total of 48% of patients had periventricular WMH (PWMH) and 39% of them had deep WMH (DWMH). Patients with higher dysthymia and lower hyperthymia (H-DCIA group) were more likely to have higher BHS scores (BHS ≥ 9 = 77% vs. 52%; p > 0.001), more WMH (46% vs. 29%; χ2n = 3 = 9.90; p < 0.05), higher MINI suicidal risk (54% vs. 42%; p < 0.05), and more recent suicide attempts (24% vs. 14%; p < 0.05), than patients with higher hyperthymia and lower dysthymia (H-H group). Limitations: The small sample size did not allow the generalization of the present findings. Conclusions: Differences among temperament groups measured by the TEMPS-A are associated with differences in their MRIs, indicating that different temperament profiles are associated with differences in the subcortical structures of the brain. The implications of the results were discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-55
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of affective disorders
Volume129
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2011

Keywords

  • Affective temperaments
  • DWMH
  • MRI
  • Mood disorders
  • PWMH
  • Suicidal risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Serafini, G., Pompili, M., Innamorati, M., Fusar-Poli, P., Akiskal, H. S., Rihmer, Z., Lester, D., Romano, A., De Oliveira, I. R., Strusi, L., Ferracuti, S., Girardi, P., & Tatarelli, R. (2011). Affective temperamental profiles are associated with white matter hyperintensity and suicidal risk in patients with mood disorders. Journal of affective disorders, 129(1-3), 47-55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2010.07.020