Adult movements of newly introduced alien Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera

Chrysomelidae) from non-host habitats

S. Toepfer, N. Levay, J. Kiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mark-release-recapture experiments were undertaken in order to investigate the movement of adult Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte from accidental introduction points towards suitable habitats, such as its host plant, Zea mays L. In Hungary in 2003 and 2004, nine mark-release-recapture experiments were carried out in a grass steppe area and lucerne field, in which two small maize fields (10 × 10 m) had been planted 300 m distant from the central release point. After each release of 5500 to 6000 marked D. v. virgifera, beetle recaptures were recorded three times using non-baited yellow sticky traps placed on 30, 105, 205 and 305 m radii around the release point. In seven out of 15 recapture periods (47%), beetle populations showed no directional movements, and their movements towards any particular habitat cannot be predicted. During five recapture periods (33%), beetle populations showed a uni-directional movement, and in three cases (20%) a bidirectional movement was observed. In 10 out of 15 recapture periods (67%), the released populations moved in a direction that was comparable with the mean wind direction during these periods; thus, beetle movements were slightly correlated with wind direction. On average over sites and years, beetles were not preferentially moving towards the two small maize fields (located 300 m from the release point) compared to other directions. However, beetles moved significantly more frequently in the direction of naturally-occurring maize fields within a radius of 1500 m than towards other habitats. Beetles stayed-more frequently within flowering lucerne fields out to a radius of 300 and 600 m than in non-flowering lucerne or other habitats. On average, 2.8% (SD 3.2) of all recaptured beetles arrived in one of the two small maize fields located 300 m from their release point indicating that there is a high risk of a founder population establishing. Habitat management cannot be suggested as a means of preventing the beetle's initial dispersal because movement was usually non-directional, and alternative food plants were used prior to reaching maize.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-335
Number of pages9
JournalBulletin of Entomological Research
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Diabrotica virgifera virgifera
Chrysomelidae
Coleoptera
habitats
corn
alfalfa
mark-recapture studies
wind direction
sticky traps
habitat conservation
founder effect
food plants
steppes
Hungary
host plants
Zea mays
grasses
flowering

Keywords

  • Diabrotica virgifera virgifera
  • Dispersal
  • Europe
  • Invasive alien species
  • Mark-release-recapture
  • Western corn rootworm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

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title = "Adult movements of newly introduced alien Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from non-host habitats",
abstract = "Mark-release-recapture experiments were undertaken in order to investigate the movement of adult Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte from accidental introduction points towards suitable habitats, such as its host plant, Zea mays L. In Hungary in 2003 and 2004, nine mark-release-recapture experiments were carried out in a grass steppe area and lucerne field, in which two small maize fields (10 × 10 m) had been planted 300 m distant from the central release point. After each release of 5500 to 6000 marked D. v. virgifera, beetle recaptures were recorded three times using non-baited yellow sticky traps placed on 30, 105, 205 and 305 m radii around the release point. In seven out of 15 recapture periods (47{\%}), beetle populations showed no directional movements, and their movements towards any particular habitat cannot be predicted. During five recapture periods (33{\%}), beetle populations showed a uni-directional movement, and in three cases (20{\%}) a bidirectional movement was observed. In 10 out of 15 recapture periods (67{\%}), the released populations moved in a direction that was comparable with the mean wind direction during these periods; thus, beetle movements were slightly correlated with wind direction. On average over sites and years, beetles were not preferentially moving towards the two small maize fields (located 300 m from the release point) compared to other directions. However, beetles moved significantly more frequently in the direction of naturally-occurring maize fields within a radius of 1500 m than towards other habitats. Beetles stayed-more frequently within flowering lucerne fields out to a radius of 300 and 600 m than in non-flowering lucerne or other habitats. On average, 2.8{\%} (SD 3.2) of all recaptured beetles arrived in one of the two small maize fields located 300 m from their release point indicating that there is a high risk of a founder population establishing. Habitat management cannot be suggested as a means of preventing the beetle's initial dispersal because movement was usually non-directional, and alternative food plants were used prior to reaching maize.",
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AB - Mark-release-recapture experiments were undertaken in order to investigate the movement of adult Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte from accidental introduction points towards suitable habitats, such as its host plant, Zea mays L. In Hungary in 2003 and 2004, nine mark-release-recapture experiments were carried out in a grass steppe area and lucerne field, in which two small maize fields (10 × 10 m) had been planted 300 m distant from the central release point. After each release of 5500 to 6000 marked D. v. virgifera, beetle recaptures were recorded three times using non-baited yellow sticky traps placed on 30, 105, 205 and 305 m radii around the release point. In seven out of 15 recapture periods (47%), beetle populations showed no directional movements, and their movements towards any particular habitat cannot be predicted. During five recapture periods (33%), beetle populations showed a uni-directional movement, and in three cases (20%) a bidirectional movement was observed. In 10 out of 15 recapture periods (67%), the released populations moved in a direction that was comparable with the mean wind direction during these periods; thus, beetle movements were slightly correlated with wind direction. On average over sites and years, beetles were not preferentially moving towards the two small maize fields (located 300 m from the release point) compared to other directions. However, beetles moved significantly more frequently in the direction of naturally-occurring maize fields within a radius of 1500 m than towards other habitats. Beetles stayed-more frequently within flowering lucerne fields out to a radius of 300 and 600 m than in non-flowering lucerne or other habitats. On average, 2.8% (SD 3.2) of all recaptured beetles arrived in one of the two small maize fields located 300 m from their release point indicating that there is a high risk of a founder population establishing. Habitat management cannot be suggested as a means of preventing the beetle's initial dispersal because movement was usually non-directional, and alternative food plants were used prior to reaching maize.

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