Adsorption of sugar surfactants at the air/water interface

Imre Varga, R. Mészáros, Cosima Stubenrauch, T. Gilányi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The adsorption isotherms of n-decyl-β-d-glucoside (β-C 10G 1) as well as various n-alkyl-β-d-maltosides (β-C nG 2) with n=8, 10, 12 and 14 were determined from surface tension measurements. Based on the analysis of the adsorption isotherms, the total free energy change of adsorption was determined and a novel method was proposed to determine the maximum adsorbed amount of surfactant. It can be concluded that the driving force for adsorption first increases with increasing adsorbed amount of the sugar surfactants and then levels off in a plateau. This peculiar behaviour is interpreted as formation of a thin liquid-like alkane film of overlapping alkyl chains at the air/water interface once a certain adsorbed amount is exceeded. The driving force of adsorption depends on the alkyl chain length only and is not affected by the type of the head group. The hydrophobic contribution to the standard free energy change of adsorption was compared with the values of sodium alkylsulfate and alkyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants. This comparison reveals that the hydrophobic driving force of adsorption is the largest for the sodium alkylsulfates, whereas it is the same for the sugar surfactants and the alkyltrimethylammonium bromides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-83
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Colloid and Interface Science
Volume379
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2012

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Surface-Active Agents
Sugars
Surface active agents
Adsorption
Water
Air
Bromides
Adsorption isotherms
Free energy
Sodium
Alkanes
Glucosides
Chain length
Paraffins
Surface tension
Liquids

Keywords

  • 2D alkane film
  • Adsorption
  • Hydrophobic driving force
  • Monolayer capacity
  • Sugar surfactant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Adsorption of sugar surfactants at the air/water interface. / Varga, Imre; Mészáros, R.; Stubenrauch, Cosima; Gilányi, T.

In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 379, No. 1, 01.08.2012, p. 78-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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