Adsorption-induced structural changes of rh supported by TiO2(110)-(1×2)

An STM study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effectsof different gases (CO, NO, H2, CO2) on the morphological changes of Rh nanoparticles deposited on TiO2(110)-(1×2) surface were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. The planar model catalyst surface was prepared by evaporation of Rh on TiO2 at room temperature followed by annealing in UHV. By the variation of the Rh content and the annealing temperature Rh nanoparticles can be produced in the range of 1-10 nm. A very rapid disintegration of the supported Rh naanoparticles of 1-2 nm to atomically dispersed Rh was observed at 300 K even after a few minutes exposure to a pressure of 10-1 mbar CO. For particle sizes of 3-4 nm the CO-induced process becameslower, and for larger Rh clusters(8-10 nm) it did not occur at all even at higher CO pressure. Keeping the atomically dispersed Rh in CO above 500 K led to the reformation of the Rh dusters but of larger size. The CO-induced agglomeration was also observed for larger Rh particles (5-6 nm) above 500 K. The adsorption of NO on Rh nanoparticles also resulted in the disruption of Rhx crystallites at 300K. It was not observed, however, in the presence of H2 and CO2, which was explained by the different nature of their interaction with Rh.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-101
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Catalysis
Volume183
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Carbon Monoxide
Nanoparticles
Adsorption
nanoparticles
adsorption
Annealing
annealing
Disintegration
disintegration
Scanning tunneling microscopy
agglomeration
Crystallites
crystallites
scanning tunneling microscopy
Evaporation
Agglomeration
Particle size
evaporation
catalysts
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Process Chemistry and Technology

Cite this

Adsorption-induced structural changes of rh supported by TiO2(110)-(1×2) : An STM study. / Berkó, A.; Solymosi, F.

In: Journal of Catalysis, Vol. 183, No. 1, 1999, p. 91-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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