Adsorption and reactions of CH2I2 on Ru(001) surface

A. Kis, K. C. Smith, J. Kiss, F. Solymosi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The adsorption and dissociation of CH2I2 were studied at 110 K with the aim of generating CH2 species on the Ru(001) surface. The methods used included X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and work function measurements. Adsorption of CH2I2 is characterized by a work function decrease (0.96 eV at monolayer), indicating that adsorbed CH2I2 has a positive outward dipole moment. Three adsorption states were distinguished: a multilayer (Tp = 200 K), a weakly bonded state (Tp = 220 K) and an irreversibly adsorbed state. A new feature is the formation of CH3I, which desorbs with Tp = 160 K. The adsorption of CH2I2 at 110 K is dissociative at submonolayer, but molecular at higher coverages. Dissociation of the monolayer to CH2 and I proceeded at 198-230 K, as indicated by a shift in the I(3d5/2) binding energy from 620.6 eV to 619.9 eV. A fraction of adsorbed CH2 is self-hydrogenated into CH4 (Tp = 220 K), and another one is coupled to di-σ-bonded ethylene, which - instead of desorption - is converted to ethylidyne at 220-300 K. Illumination of the adsorbed CH2I2 initiated the dissociation of CH2I2 monolayer even at 110 K, and affected the reaction pathways of CH2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-202
Number of pages13
JournalSurface Science
Volume460
Issue number1-3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 20 2000

Fingerprint

Adsorption
Monolayers
adsorption
dissociation
desorption
photoelectron spectroscopy
Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy
Dipole moment
ultraviolet spectroscopy
Auger electron spectroscopy
Temperature programmed desorption
Binding energy
Auger spectroscopy
electron spectroscopy
Desorption
Ethylene
Multilayers
dipole moments
ethylene
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Alkanes
  • Alkynes
  • Ruthenium
  • Single crystal surfaces
  • Surface photochemistry
  • Thermal desorption spectroscopy
  • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

Adsorption and reactions of CH2I2 on Ru(001) surface. / Kis, A.; Smith, K. C.; Kiss, J.; Solymosi, F.

In: Surface Science, Vol. 460, No. 1-3, 20.07.2000, p. 190-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kis, A, Smith, KC, Kiss, J & Solymosi, F 2000, 'Adsorption and reactions of CH2I2 on Ru(001) surface', Surface Science, vol. 460, no. 1-3, pp. 190-202.
Kis, A. ; Smith, K. C. ; Kiss, J. ; Solymosi, F. / Adsorption and reactions of CH2I2 on Ru(001) surface. In: Surface Science. 2000 ; Vol. 460, No. 1-3. pp. 190-202.
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