Adsorption and decomposition of HNCO on Cu(111) surface studied by auger electron, electron energy loss and thermal desorption spectroscopy

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Abstract

No detectable adsorbed species were observed after exposure of HNCO to a clean Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The presence of adsorbed oxygen, however, exerted a dramatic influence on the adsorptive properties of this surface and caused the dissociative adsorption of HNCO with concomitant release of water. The adsorption of HNCO at 300 K produced two new strong losses at 10.4 and 13.5 eV in electron energy loss spectra, which were not observed during the adsorption of either CO or atomic N. These loses can be attributed to surface NCO on Cu(111). The surface isocyanate was stable up to 400 K. The decomposition in the adsorbed phase began with the evolution of CO2. The desorption of nitrogen started at 700 K. Above 800 K, the formation of C2N2 was observed. The characteristics of the CO2 formation and the ratios of the products sensitively depended on the amount of preadsorbed oxygen. No HNCO was desorbed as such, and neither NCO nor (NCO)2 were detected during the desorption. From the comparison of adsorption and desorption behaviours of HNCO, N, CO and CO2 on copper surfaces it was concluded that NCO exists as such on a Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The interaction of HNCO with oxygen covered Cu(111) surface and the reactions of surface NCO with adsorbed oxygen are discussed in detail.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-198
Number of pages18
JournalSurface Science
Volume104
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 1981

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Thermal desorption spectroscopy
Energy dissipation
energy dissipation
desorption
electron energy
Decomposition
decomposition
Adsorption
adsorption
Electrons
spectroscopy
electrons
Oxygen
Desorption
oxygen
Carbon Monoxide
isocyanates
Isocyanates
surface reactions
Copper

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

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title = "Adsorption and decomposition of HNCO on Cu(111) surface studied by auger electron, electron energy loss and thermal desorption spectroscopy",
abstract = "No detectable adsorbed species were observed after exposure of HNCO to a clean Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The presence of adsorbed oxygen, however, exerted a dramatic influence on the adsorptive properties of this surface and caused the dissociative adsorption of HNCO with concomitant release of water. The adsorption of HNCO at 300 K produced two new strong losses at 10.4 and 13.5 eV in electron energy loss spectra, which were not observed during the adsorption of either CO or atomic N. These loses can be attributed to surface NCO on Cu(111). The surface isocyanate was stable up to 400 K. The decomposition in the adsorbed phase began with the evolution of CO2. The desorption of nitrogen started at 700 K. Above 800 K, the formation of C2N2 was observed. The characteristics of the CO2 formation and the ratios of the products sensitively depended on the amount of preadsorbed oxygen. No HNCO was desorbed as such, and neither NCO nor (NCO)2 were detected during the desorption. From the comparison of adsorption and desorption behaviours of HNCO, N, CO and CO2 on copper surfaces it was concluded that NCO exists as such on a Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The interaction of HNCO with oxygen covered Cu(111) surface and the reactions of surface NCO with adsorbed oxygen are discussed in detail.",
author = "F. Solymosi and J. Kiss",
year = "1981",
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T1 - Adsorption and decomposition of HNCO on Cu(111) surface studied by auger electron, electron energy loss and thermal desorption spectroscopy

AU - Solymosi, F.

AU - Kiss, J.

PY - 1981/3/1

Y1 - 1981/3/1

N2 - No detectable adsorbed species were observed after exposure of HNCO to a clean Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The presence of adsorbed oxygen, however, exerted a dramatic influence on the adsorptive properties of this surface and caused the dissociative adsorption of HNCO with concomitant release of water. The adsorption of HNCO at 300 K produced two new strong losses at 10.4 and 13.5 eV in electron energy loss spectra, which were not observed during the adsorption of either CO or atomic N. These loses can be attributed to surface NCO on Cu(111). The surface isocyanate was stable up to 400 K. The decomposition in the adsorbed phase began with the evolution of CO2. The desorption of nitrogen started at 700 K. Above 800 K, the formation of C2N2 was observed. The characteristics of the CO2 formation and the ratios of the products sensitively depended on the amount of preadsorbed oxygen. No HNCO was desorbed as such, and neither NCO nor (NCO)2 were detected during the desorption. From the comparison of adsorption and desorption behaviours of HNCO, N, CO and CO2 on copper surfaces it was concluded that NCO exists as such on a Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The interaction of HNCO with oxygen covered Cu(111) surface and the reactions of surface NCO with adsorbed oxygen are discussed in detail.

AB - No detectable adsorbed species were observed after exposure of HNCO to a clean Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The presence of adsorbed oxygen, however, exerted a dramatic influence on the adsorptive properties of this surface and caused the dissociative adsorption of HNCO with concomitant release of water. The adsorption of HNCO at 300 K produced two new strong losses at 10.4 and 13.5 eV in electron energy loss spectra, which were not observed during the adsorption of either CO or atomic N. These loses can be attributed to surface NCO on Cu(111). The surface isocyanate was stable up to 400 K. The decomposition in the adsorbed phase began with the evolution of CO2. The desorption of nitrogen started at 700 K. Above 800 K, the formation of C2N2 was observed. The characteristics of the CO2 formation and the ratios of the products sensitively depended on the amount of preadsorbed oxygen. No HNCO was desorbed as such, and neither NCO nor (NCO)2 were detected during the desorption. From the comparison of adsorption and desorption behaviours of HNCO, N, CO and CO2 on copper surfaces it was concluded that NCO exists as such on a Cu(111) surface at 300 K. The interaction of HNCO with oxygen covered Cu(111) surface and the reactions of surface NCO with adsorbed oxygen are discussed in detail.

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