Adaptive response and stress transfer of plant production and connected systems

K. Rajkai, Zsófia Bakacsi, Árpád Törzsök, Szilárd Keszthelyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the real world systems are in many ways interrelated to other systems, applying stress on one of them will have an effect on the other. In a controlled system, adaptive response can be improved in a way that the connected systems face less stress. In this approach we take plant production as a system controlled through nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation, and nitrogen leaching as an example for stress imposed on the connected ecological system. A plant growth model is used to demonstrate adaptation ways to different direct environmental stressors as drought and deficiency of available nitrogen. The adaptive response of the plant (i.e. slower growth) imposes stress on the ecological system. The amount of stress transferred by a controlled system can be reduced through control. Such a control presumes using models to predict adaptive response, feedback control is prone to over regulation. Modeling also allows easy interfacing to other modeled systems like ecologic or even the economic system, and thus the amount of stress transferred can be balanced to avoid extreme consequences. Our conclusion is that careful analysis and a better control can improve sustainability of plant production even within changing climatic and economic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-68
Number of pages4
JournalCereal Research Communications
Volume37
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Ecosystem
economic systems
Nitrogen
nitrogen
growth models
plant response
leaching
nitrogen fertilizers
Economics
drought
plant growth
irrigation
economics
Droughts
Fertilizers
Growth

Keywords

  • Crop model
  • Economy sub-model
  • Environmental stress
  • Fertilization
  • Nitrogen leaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics
  • Physiology

Cite this

Adaptive response and stress transfer of plant production and connected systems. / Rajkai, K.; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Törzsök, Árpád; Keszthelyi, Szilárd.

In: Cereal Research Communications, Vol. 37, No. SUPPL.1, 2009, p. 65-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajkai, K. ; Bakacsi, Zsófia ; Törzsök, Árpád ; Keszthelyi, Szilárd. / Adaptive response and stress transfer of plant production and connected systems. In: Cereal Research Communications. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. SUPPL.1. pp. 65-68.
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