Acute binge drinking increases serum endotoxin and bacterial DNA levels in healthy individuals

Shashi Bala, Miguel Marcos, Arijeet Gattu, Donna Catalano, G. Szabó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Binge drinking, the most common form of alcohol consumption, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity; yet, its biological consequences are poorly defined. Previous studies demonstrated that chronic alcohol use results in increased gut permeability and increased serum endotoxin levels that contribute to many of the biological effects of chronic alcohol, including alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we evaluated the effects of acute binge drinking in healthy adults on serum endotoxin levels. We found that acute alcohol binge resulted in a rapid increase in serum endotoxin and 16S rDNA, a marker of bacterial translocation from the gut. Compared to men, women had higher blood alcohol and circulating endotoxin levels. In addition, alcohol binge caused a prolonged increase in acute phase protein levels in the systemic circulation. The biological significance of the in vivo endotoxin elevation was underscored by increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, and chemokine, MCP-1, measured in total blood after in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Our findings indicate that even a single alcohol binge results in increased serum endotoxin levels likely due to translocation of gut bacterial products and disturbs innate immune responses that can contribute to the deleterious effects of binge drinking.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere96864
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 14 2014

Fingerprint

Binge Drinking
Bacterial DNA
binging
endotoxins
blood serum
Endotoxins
alcohols
Alcohols
DNA
Serum
Bacterial Translocation
digestive system
Blood
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
acute phase proteins
Acute-Phase Proteins
blood
liver diseases
alcohol abuse
Ribosomal DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Acute binge drinking increases serum endotoxin and bacterial DNA levels in healthy individuals. / Bala, Shashi; Marcos, Miguel; Gattu, Arijeet; Catalano, Donna; Szabó, G.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 5, e96864, 14.05.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bala, Shashi ; Marcos, Miguel ; Gattu, Arijeet ; Catalano, Donna ; Szabó, G. / Acute binge drinking increases serum endotoxin and bacterial DNA levels in healthy individuals. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 5.
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