Activity of caudate nucleus neurons in a visual fixation paradigm in behaving cats

Tamás Nagypál, Péter Gombköto, Balázs Barkóczi, G. Benedek, A. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beside its motor functions, the caudate nucleus (CN), the main input structure of the basal ganglia, is also sensitive to various sensory modalities. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of visual stimulation on the CN by using a behaving, head-restrained, eye movement-controlled feline model developed recently for this purpose. Extracellular multielectrode recordings were made from the CN of two cats in a visual fixation paradigm applying static and dynamic stimuli. The recorded neurons were classified in three groups according to their electrophysiological properties: phasically active (PAN), tonically active (TAN) and high-firing (HFN) neurons. The response characteristics were investigated according to this classification. The PAN and TAN neurons were sensitive primarily to static stimuli, while the HFN neurons responded primarily to changes in the visual environment i.e. to optic flow and the offset of the stimuli. The HFNs were the most sensitive to visual stimulation; their responses were stronger than those of the PANs and TANs. The majority of the recorded units were insensitive to the direction of the optic flow, regardless of group, but a small number of direction-sensitive neurons were also found. Our results demonstrate that both the static and the dynamic components of the visual information are represented in the CN. Furthermore, these results provide the first piece of evidence on optic flow processing in the CN, which, in more general terms, indicates the possible role of this structure in dynamic visual information processing.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0142526
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 6 2015

Fingerprint

Caudate Nucleus
Triacetoneamine-N-Oxyl
Neurons
Optic Flow
Cats
neurons
cats
optics
Optics
Photic Stimulation
Eye movements
Felidae
Eye Movements
Basal Ganglia
Automatic Data Processing
eyes
Head
Processing
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Activity of caudate nucleus neurons in a visual fixation paradigm in behaving cats. / Nagypál, Tamás; Gombköto, Péter; Barkóczi, Balázs; Benedek, G.; Nagy, A.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 11, e0142526, 06.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagypál, Tamás ; Gombköto, Péter ; Barkóczi, Balázs ; Benedek, G. ; Nagy, A. / Activity of caudate nucleus neurons in a visual fixation paradigm in behaving cats. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 11.
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