Action-related auditory ERP attenuation: Paradigms and hypotheses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number studies have shown that the auditory N1 event-related potential (ERP) is attenuated when elicited by self-induced or self-generated sounds. Because N1 is a correlate of auditory feature- and event-detection, it was generally assumed that N1-attenuation reflected the cancellation of auditory re-afference, enabled by the internal forward modeling of the predictable sensory consequences of the given action. Focusing on paradigms utilizing non-speech actions, the present review summarizes recent progress on action-related auditory attenuation. Following a critical analysis of the most widely used, contingent paradigm, two further hypotheses on the possible causes of action-related auditory ERP attenuation are presented. The attention hypotheses suggest that auditory ERP attenuation is brought about by a temporary division of attention between the action and the auditory stimulation. The pre-activation hypothesis suggests that the attenuation is caused by the activation of a sensory template during the initiation of the action, which interferes with the incoming stimulation. Although each hypothesis can account for a number of findings, none of them can accommodate the whole spectrum of results. It is suggested that a better understanding of auditory ERP attenuation phenomena could be achieved by systematic investigations of the types of actions, the degree of action-effect contingency, and the temporal characteristics of action-effect contingency representation-buildup and -deactivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-65
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Research
Volume1626
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 11 2015

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Evoked Potentials
Acoustic Stimulation

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Event-related potentials (ERP)
  • Forward modeling
  • Hearing
  • Prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Action-related auditory ERP attenuation : Paradigms and hypotheses. / Horváth, J.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1626, 11.11.2015, p. 54-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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