A Magyar Népmese Archívum és az új magyar nepmese katalógus (típus- és motívumindex) Eredmények és feladatok, elomunkálatok és tudományos szintézis

Translated title of the contribution: Achievements and tasks, preliminary works and academic synthesis: A proposal for the establishment of the Hungarian Folktale Archives and the elaboration of a new Hungarian tale type catalogue and motif index

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The compilation of catalogues of folk poetry , indices of types and motifs has been an eminent task in international folkloristics for more than a century. There have been about one hundred and fifty- publications categorizing the tales of a given nation or ethnic group, in most cases following the Aarne-Thompson catalogue, whose revised and extended edition by Hans-Jorg Uther was published in 2004 (The Types of International Folktales: A Classification and Bibliography). Hungarian folktale research, in compliance with international trends, has made repeated efforts to classify' and sy stematize the ty pes of the national tale repertoire. Honti Janos published the first catalogue of Hungarian tale ty pes in 1928 within the series of Folklore Fellows Communications. The next, two- volume catalogue by Berze Nagy Janos, published posthumously in 1957, relied on a much more extended corpus, yet it could present only a segment of Hungarian folktales. Finally, the eleven- volume Catalogue of Hungarian Folktales (MNK), whose editor-in-chief was Agnes Kovacs, and was prepared at the Institute of Ethnology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, was published between 1982 and 1990. It is based on the AaTh-sy stem and is one of the most detailed tale ty pe catalogue in the world. The author of the article, besides acknowledging the achievements of Hungarian folktale research so far, draws attention to the fact that it is time to compile a new catalogue of Hungarian folktales that is to be a most comprehensive one overcoming the shortcomings and fallacies of the former catalogues. The main reason for the elaboration of a new catalogue is that at the turn of the millennia a boom of folktale research has disclosed thousands of formerly unknown archival as well as contemporary tales, and a number of local collections and monographs on outstanding taletellers and their repertoires have been published. Due to this, according to the author, the number of currently known Hungarian folktales is twice as much as was available for the editors of the Catalogue of Hungarian Folktales in the 1980s. The precondition for a representative scholarly classification is the existence of a comprehensive archives. The author proposes the establishment of a national archives of folktales at the Institute of Ethnology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences to collect and to publish this cultural heritage (gradually in a digital form as well) and to aid the complete systematization of Hungarian folktales.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)26-68
Number of pages43
JournalEthnographia
Volume129
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

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ethnology
Academy of Sciences
editor-in-chief
folklore
cultural heritage
bibliography
edition
poetry
ethnic group
communications
editor
trend
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology

Cite this

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abstract = "The compilation of catalogues of folk poetry , indices of types and motifs has been an eminent task in international folkloristics for more than a century. There have been about one hundred and fifty- publications categorizing the tales of a given nation or ethnic group, in most cases following the Aarne-Thompson catalogue, whose revised and extended edition by Hans-Jorg Uther was published in 2004 (The Types of International Folktales: A Classification and Bibliography). Hungarian folktale research, in compliance with international trends, has made repeated efforts to classify' and sy stematize the ty pes of the national tale repertoire. Honti Janos published the first catalogue of Hungarian tale ty pes in 1928 within the series of Folklore Fellows Communications. The next, two- volume catalogue by Berze Nagy Janos, published posthumously in 1957, relied on a much more extended corpus, yet it could present only a segment of Hungarian folktales. Finally, the eleven- volume Catalogue of Hungarian Folktales (MNK), whose editor-in-chief was Agnes Kovacs, and was prepared at the Institute of Ethnology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, was published between 1982 and 1990. It is based on the AaTh-sy stem and is one of the most detailed tale ty pe catalogue in the world. The author of the article, besides acknowledging the achievements of Hungarian folktale research so far, draws attention to the fact that it is time to compile a new catalogue of Hungarian folktales that is to be a most comprehensive one overcoming the shortcomings and fallacies of the former catalogues. The main reason for the elaboration of a new catalogue is that at the turn of the millennia a boom of folktale research has disclosed thousands of formerly unknown archival as well as contemporary tales, and a number of local collections and monographs on outstanding taletellers and their repertoires have been published. Due to this, according to the author, the number of currently known Hungarian folktales is twice as much as was available for the editors of the Catalogue of Hungarian Folktales in the 1980s. The precondition for a representative scholarly classification is the existence of a comprehensive archives. The author proposes the establishment of a national archives of folktales at the Institute of Ethnology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences to collect and to publish this cultural heritage (gradually in a digital form as well) and to aid the complete systematization of Hungarian folktales.",
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