Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation

Adam Varga, Barbara Sandor, Karoly Kalmar Nagy, Maria Viola, Andras Toth, Katalin Gombos, K. Tóth, Peter Szakaly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality after kidney transplantation. According to guidelines, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) must be given as preventive antiplatelet therapy, but resistance to this drug is also well-known. Patients and Methods: A total of 214 renal transplant patients were included in our study and took 100 mg of ASA q.d. Aggregometry was performed to determine resistance. Twenty-four variables were examined using logistic regression analysis as possible causes of resistance. Results: ASA resistance was observed in 40.18% of the patients. Resistance reduced concomitant statin therapy and significantly increased simultaneous cyclosporine therapy. Conclusion: Our study assessed the post-transplant ASA resistance in a large population. Clarification of this matter is crutial, since one of the major preventive pharmacological therapies of cardiovascular mortality is not effective in a significant number of patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-144
Number of pages4
JournalIn Vivo
Volume29
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Acid resistance
Kidney Transplantation
Aspirin
Transplants
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Mortality
Therapeutics
Drug Resistance
Regression analysis
Cyclosporine
Logistics
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Pharmacology
Guidelines
Kidney
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

Keywords

  • Acetylsalicylic acid resistance
  • Aggregometry
  • Cardiovascular complication
  • Platelet aggregation
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Varga, A., Sandor, B., Nagy, K. K., Viola, M., Toth, A., Gombos, K., ... Szakaly, P. (2015). Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation. In Vivo, 29(1), 141-144.

Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation. / Varga, Adam; Sandor, Barbara; Nagy, Karoly Kalmar; Viola, Maria; Toth, Andras; Gombos, Katalin; Tóth, K.; Szakaly, Peter.

In: In Vivo, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 141-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Varga, A, Sandor, B, Nagy, KK, Viola, M, Toth, A, Gombos, K, Tóth, K & Szakaly, P 2015, 'Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation', In Vivo, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 141-144.
Varga A, Sandor B, Nagy KK, Viola M, Toth A, Gombos K et al. Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation. In Vivo. 2015 Jan 1;29(1):141-144.
Varga, Adam ; Sandor, Barbara ; Nagy, Karoly Kalmar ; Viola, Maria ; Toth, Andras ; Gombos, Katalin ; Tóth, K. ; Szakaly, Peter. / Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation. In: In Vivo. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 141-144.
@article{31fa36c724dc4705855159c7db17433e,
title = "Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation",
abstract = "Background: Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality after kidney transplantation. According to guidelines, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) must be given as preventive antiplatelet therapy, but resistance to this drug is also well-known. Patients and Methods: A total of 214 renal transplant patients were included in our study and took 100 mg of ASA q.d. Aggregometry was performed to determine resistance. Twenty-four variables were examined using logistic regression analysis as possible causes of resistance. Results: ASA resistance was observed in 40.18{\%} of the patients. Resistance reduced concomitant statin therapy and significantly increased simultaneous cyclosporine therapy. Conclusion: Our study assessed the post-transplant ASA resistance in a large population. Clarification of this matter is crutial, since one of the major preventive pharmacological therapies of cardiovascular mortality is not effective in a significant number of patients.",
keywords = "Acetylsalicylic acid resistance, Aggregometry, Cardiovascular complication, Platelet aggregation, Transplantation",
author = "Adam Varga and Barbara Sandor and Nagy, {Karoly Kalmar} and Maria Viola and Andras Toth and Katalin Gombos and K. T{\'o}th and Peter Szakaly",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "141--144",
journal = "In Vivo",
issn = "0258-851X",
publisher = "International Institute of Anticancer Research",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acetylsalicylic acid resistance after renal transplantation

AU - Varga, Adam

AU - Sandor, Barbara

AU - Nagy, Karoly Kalmar

AU - Viola, Maria

AU - Toth, Andras

AU - Gombos, Katalin

AU - Tóth, K.

AU - Szakaly, Peter

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality after kidney transplantation. According to guidelines, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) must be given as preventive antiplatelet therapy, but resistance to this drug is also well-known. Patients and Methods: A total of 214 renal transplant patients were included in our study and took 100 mg of ASA q.d. Aggregometry was performed to determine resistance. Twenty-four variables were examined using logistic regression analysis as possible causes of resistance. Results: ASA resistance was observed in 40.18% of the patients. Resistance reduced concomitant statin therapy and significantly increased simultaneous cyclosporine therapy. Conclusion: Our study assessed the post-transplant ASA resistance in a large population. Clarification of this matter is crutial, since one of the major preventive pharmacological therapies of cardiovascular mortality is not effective in a significant number of patients.

AB - Background: Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality after kidney transplantation. According to guidelines, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) must be given as preventive antiplatelet therapy, but resistance to this drug is also well-known. Patients and Methods: A total of 214 renal transplant patients were included in our study and took 100 mg of ASA q.d. Aggregometry was performed to determine resistance. Twenty-four variables were examined using logistic regression analysis as possible causes of resistance. Results: ASA resistance was observed in 40.18% of the patients. Resistance reduced concomitant statin therapy and significantly increased simultaneous cyclosporine therapy. Conclusion: Our study assessed the post-transplant ASA resistance in a large population. Clarification of this matter is crutial, since one of the major preventive pharmacological therapies of cardiovascular mortality is not effective in a significant number of patients.

KW - Acetylsalicylic acid resistance

KW - Aggregometry

KW - Cardiovascular complication

KW - Platelet aggregation

KW - Transplantation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84921635644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84921635644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 141

EP - 144

JO - In Vivo

JF - In Vivo

SN - 0258-851X

IS - 1

ER -