Accumulation and distribution of iron, cadmium, lead and nickel in cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing two different chelated iron supplies

Árpád Csog, V. Mihucz, E. Tatár, F. Fodor, István Virág, Cornelia Majdik, G. Záray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II), and iron supplied as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations, were investigated by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with special emphasis on the determination of iron accumulation and distribution within the different plant compartments (root, stem, cotyledon and leaves). The extent of Cd, Ni and Pb accumulation and distribution were also determined. Generally, iron and heavy-metal contaminant accumulation was higher when Fe(III) citrate was used. The accumulation of nickel and lead was higher by about 20% and 100%, respectively, if the iron supply was Fe(III) citrate. The accumulation of Cd was similar. In the case of Fe(III) citrate, the total amounts of Fe taken up were similar in the control and heavy-metal-treated plants (27-31 μmol/plant). Further, the amounts of iron transported from the root towards the shoot of the control, lead- and nickel-contaminated plants were independent of the iron(III) form. Although Fe mobility could be characterized as being low, its distribution within the shoot was not significantly affected by the heavy metals investigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1038-1044
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Plant Physiology
Volume168
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2011

Fingerprint

Hydroponics
Cucumis sativus
Nickel
nickel
Cadmium
hydroponics
cucumbers
cadmium
Iron
iron
Citric Acid
citrates
Heavy Metals
heavy metals
X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy
X-Ray Emission Spectrometry
Plant Roots
shoots
Cotyledon
Lead

Keywords

  • Heavy metals
  • Iron distribution
  • Phytotoxicity
  • Strategy I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Physiology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Accumulation and distribution of iron, cadmium, lead and nickel in cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing two different chelated iron supplies. / Csog, Árpád; Mihucz, V.; Tatár, E.; Fodor, F.; Virág, István; Majdik, Cornelia; Záray, G.

In: Journal of Plant Physiology, Vol. 168, No. 10, 01.07.2011, p. 1038-1044.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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