A short-run new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for determining low-density lipoprotein sub-fractions using Schlieren refractometry

Z. Bozóky, L. Fülöp, L. Kőhidai

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have developed a new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for the determination of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses directly from ultracentrifugal Schlieren scans. We have used special software for the analysis of this type of single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation. The flotation of LDL patterns was obtained by underlayering a physiological salt solution with serum or isolated lipoprotein fractions raised to a density of 1.3 g/mL in the spinning ultracentrifugation capillary band-forming cell. The repeated analysis of Schlieren curves of the same sample from 10 to 100 μL in the 60-100 min full-speed interval time resulted in quite reproducible results. We obtained quantitative results by measuring the Schlieren areas between the sample curves and the reference baseline curve by using computerised numerical and graphic techniques. The decomposition of the integrated curve was carried out using a nonlinear regression program followed by deconvolution algorithm analysis in order to determine the parameters of the composing Gaussian subclasses. The LDL particle concentrations were calculated from the area under the integral of the Gaussian curve using a calibration data constant. The flotation range of the LDL Schlieren curves in the cell was identified with serum from which LDL had been removed by means of precipitation reagents and with centrifugation of isolated LDL aliquots. With this technique, we measured the concentration of LDL and analysed its polydispersity without the need for preceding sequential isolation of the LDL. On the basis of the Schlieren curves, the LDL samples were either physically paucidisperse, having a symmetrical peak within a narrow density range, or were polydisperse, showing an asymmetrical pattern distributed over a broader density region. The described method proved to be useful for a clear and immediate visual presentation of the concentration values of the LDL and for the identification of the heterogeneity of LDL variants without the need for the preparative isolation of that density class.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621-627
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Biophysics Journal
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Refractometry
LDL Lipoproteins
Ultracentrifugation
Serum
Centrifugation
Calibration
Lipoproteins
Software
Salts

Keywords

  • Analytical ultracentrifugation
  • Heterogeneity
  • Low-density lipoproteins
  • Single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

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title = "A short-run new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for determining low-density lipoprotein sub-fractions using Schlieren refractometry",
abstract = "We have developed a new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for the determination of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses directly from ultracentrifugal Schlieren scans. We have used special software for the analysis of this type of single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation. The flotation of LDL patterns was obtained by underlayering a physiological salt solution with serum or isolated lipoprotein fractions raised to a density of 1.3 g/mL in the spinning ultracentrifugation capillary band-forming cell. The repeated analysis of Schlieren curves of the same sample from 10 to 100 μL in the 60-100 min full-speed interval time resulted in quite reproducible results. We obtained quantitative results by measuring the Schlieren areas between the sample curves and the reference baseline curve by using computerised numerical and graphic techniques. The decomposition of the integrated curve was carried out using a nonlinear regression program followed by deconvolution algorithm analysis in order to determine the parameters of the composing Gaussian subclasses. The LDL particle concentrations were calculated from the area under the integral of the Gaussian curve using a calibration data constant. The flotation range of the LDL Schlieren curves in the cell was identified with serum from which LDL had been removed by means of precipitation reagents and with centrifugation of isolated LDL aliquots. With this technique, we measured the concentration of LDL and analysed its polydispersity without the need for preceding sequential isolation of the LDL. On the basis of the Schlieren curves, the LDL samples were either physically paucidisperse, having a symmetrical peak within a narrow density range, or were polydisperse, showing an asymmetrical pattern distributed over a broader density region. The described method proved to be useful for a clear and immediate visual presentation of the concentration values of the LDL and for the identification of the heterogeneity of LDL variants without the need for the preparative isolation of that density class.",
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AU - Bozóky, Z.

AU - Fülöp, L.

AU - Kőhidai, L.

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N2 - We have developed a new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for the determination of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses directly from ultracentrifugal Schlieren scans. We have used special software for the analysis of this type of single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation. The flotation of LDL patterns was obtained by underlayering a physiological salt solution with serum or isolated lipoprotein fractions raised to a density of 1.3 g/mL in the spinning ultracentrifugation capillary band-forming cell. The repeated analysis of Schlieren curves of the same sample from 10 to 100 μL in the 60-100 min full-speed interval time resulted in quite reproducible results. We obtained quantitative results by measuring the Schlieren areas between the sample curves and the reference baseline curve by using computerised numerical and graphic techniques. The decomposition of the integrated curve was carried out using a nonlinear regression program followed by deconvolution algorithm analysis in order to determine the parameters of the composing Gaussian subclasses. The LDL particle concentrations were calculated from the area under the integral of the Gaussian curve using a calibration data constant. The flotation range of the LDL Schlieren curves in the cell was identified with serum from which LDL had been removed by means of precipitation reagents and with centrifugation of isolated LDL aliquots. With this technique, we measured the concentration of LDL and analysed its polydispersity without the need for preceding sequential isolation of the LDL. On the basis of the Schlieren curves, the LDL samples were either physically paucidisperse, having a symmetrical peak within a narrow density range, or were polydisperse, showing an asymmetrical pattern distributed over a broader density region. The described method proved to be useful for a clear and immediate visual presentation of the concentration values of the LDL and for the identification of the heterogeneity of LDL variants without the need for the preparative isolation of that density class.

AB - We have developed a new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for the determination of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses directly from ultracentrifugal Schlieren scans. We have used special software for the analysis of this type of single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation. The flotation of LDL patterns was obtained by underlayering a physiological salt solution with serum or isolated lipoprotein fractions raised to a density of 1.3 g/mL in the spinning ultracentrifugation capillary band-forming cell. The repeated analysis of Schlieren curves of the same sample from 10 to 100 μL in the 60-100 min full-speed interval time resulted in quite reproducible results. We obtained quantitative results by measuring the Schlieren areas between the sample curves and the reference baseline curve by using computerised numerical and graphic techniques. The decomposition of the integrated curve was carried out using a nonlinear regression program followed by deconvolution algorithm analysis in order to determine the parameters of the composing Gaussian subclasses. The LDL particle concentrations were calculated from the area under the integral of the Gaussian curve using a calibration data constant. The flotation range of the LDL Schlieren curves in the cell was identified with serum from which LDL had been removed by means of precipitation reagents and with centrifugation of isolated LDL aliquots. With this technique, we measured the concentration of LDL and analysed its polydispersity without the need for preceding sequential isolation of the LDL. On the basis of the Schlieren curves, the LDL samples were either physically paucidisperse, having a symmetrical peak within a narrow density range, or were polydisperse, showing an asymmetrical pattern distributed over a broader density region. The described method proved to be useful for a clear and immediate visual presentation of the concentration values of the LDL and for the identification of the heterogeneity of LDL variants without the need for the preparative isolation of that density class.

KW - Analytical ultracentrifugation

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KW - Single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation

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