A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

Zoltán Nyárády, Árpád Németh, Ágnes Bán, Adél Mukics, József Nyárády, I. Ember, Lajos Olasz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This prospective randomized study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of oral pilocarpine chloratum (Salagen) during and after radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between October 1999 and December 2003, 66 patients received 60 Gy of irradiation to their head and neck cancer. Half of the patients received 5 mg oral pilocarpine 3 times a day from the beginning of radiotherapy over a period of 12 weeks. The control group received similar doses of pilocarpine only in the second 6 weeks following irradiation. Patient saliva secretion was recorded, and a visual analog scale measuring overall and daily xerostomia, difficulty in sleeping, speaking, eating and wearing dentures was employed. Results: Pilocarpine, given concomitantly with radiotherapy, statistically improved the salivary flow and induced better patient comfort by the end of radiotherapy. Patient comfort and symptoms related to xerostomia greatly decreased compared to patients receiving pilocarpine after irradiation in the second 6-week period of therapy. The patients' quality of life, saliva production and symptoms related to xerostomia showed significant progress by the end of the 12 weeks. Conclusion: The results suggest that stimulated salivary glands suffer less decrease in saliva production during radiotherapy. The stimulated saliva flow reduced the side-effects of irradiation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1557-1562
Number of pages6
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume26
Issue number2 B
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

Pilocarpine
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Saliva
Xerostomia
Dentures
Salivary Glands
Visual Analog Scale
Eating
Quality of Life
Prospective Studies
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Head and neck cancer
  • Pilocarpine chloratum
  • Radiotherapy
  • Salagen
  • Squamous cell cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Nyárády, Z., Németh, Á., Bán, Á., Mukics, A., Nyárády, J., Ember, I., & Olasz, L. (2006). A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Anticancer Research, 26(2 B), 1557-1562.

A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. / Nyárády, Zoltán; Németh, Árpád; Bán, Ágnes; Mukics, Adél; Nyárády, József; Ember, I.; Olasz, Lajos.

In: Anticancer Research, Vol. 26, No. 2 B, 03.2006, p. 1557-1562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nyárády, Z, Németh, Á, Bán, Á, Mukics, A, Nyárády, J, Ember, I & Olasz, L 2006, 'A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer', Anticancer Research, vol. 26, no. 2 B, pp. 1557-1562.
Nyárády, Zoltán ; Németh, Árpád ; Bán, Ágnes ; Mukics, Adél ; Nyárády, József ; Ember, I. ; Olasz, Lajos. / A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. In: Anticancer Research. 2006 ; Vol. 26, No. 2 B. pp. 1557-1562.
@article{301c45cbf68d48d5ae8032fe10b6445b,
title = "A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer",
abstract = "Background: This prospective randomized study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of oral pilocarpine chloratum (Salagen) during and after radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between October 1999 and December 2003, 66 patients received 60 Gy of irradiation to their head and neck cancer. Half of the patients received 5 mg oral pilocarpine 3 times a day from the beginning of radiotherapy over a period of 12 weeks. The control group received similar doses of pilocarpine only in the second 6 weeks following irradiation. Patient saliva secretion was recorded, and a visual analog scale measuring overall and daily xerostomia, difficulty in sleeping, speaking, eating and wearing dentures was employed. Results: Pilocarpine, given concomitantly with radiotherapy, statistically improved the salivary flow and induced better patient comfort by the end of radiotherapy. Patient comfort and symptoms related to xerostomia greatly decreased compared to patients receiving pilocarpine after irradiation in the second 6-week period of therapy. The patients' quality of life, saliva production and symptoms related to xerostomia showed significant progress by the end of the 12 weeks. Conclusion: The results suggest that stimulated salivary glands suffer less decrease in saliva production during radiotherapy. The stimulated saliva flow reduced the side-effects of irradiation.",
keywords = "Head and neck cancer, Pilocarpine chloratum, Radiotherapy, Salagen, Squamous cell cancer",
author = "Zolt{\'a}n Ny{\'a}r{\'a}dy and {\'A}rp{\'a}d N{\'e}meth and {\'A}gnes B{\'a}n and Ad{\'e}l Mukics and J{\'o}zsef Ny{\'a}r{\'a}dy and I. Ember and Lajos Olasz",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1557--1562",
journal = "Anticancer Research",
issn = "0250-7005",
publisher = "International Institute of Anticancer Research",
number = "2 B",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized study to assess the effectiveness of orally administered pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

AU - Nyárády, Zoltán

AU - Németh, Árpád

AU - Bán, Ágnes

AU - Mukics, Adél

AU - Nyárády, József

AU - Ember, I.

AU - Olasz, Lajos

PY - 2006/3

Y1 - 2006/3

N2 - Background: This prospective randomized study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of oral pilocarpine chloratum (Salagen) during and after radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between October 1999 and December 2003, 66 patients received 60 Gy of irradiation to their head and neck cancer. Half of the patients received 5 mg oral pilocarpine 3 times a day from the beginning of radiotherapy over a period of 12 weeks. The control group received similar doses of pilocarpine only in the second 6 weeks following irradiation. Patient saliva secretion was recorded, and a visual analog scale measuring overall and daily xerostomia, difficulty in sleeping, speaking, eating and wearing dentures was employed. Results: Pilocarpine, given concomitantly with radiotherapy, statistically improved the salivary flow and induced better patient comfort by the end of radiotherapy. Patient comfort and symptoms related to xerostomia greatly decreased compared to patients receiving pilocarpine after irradiation in the second 6-week period of therapy. The patients' quality of life, saliva production and symptoms related to xerostomia showed significant progress by the end of the 12 weeks. Conclusion: The results suggest that stimulated salivary glands suffer less decrease in saliva production during radiotherapy. The stimulated saliva flow reduced the side-effects of irradiation.

AB - Background: This prospective randomized study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of oral pilocarpine chloratum (Salagen) during and after radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between October 1999 and December 2003, 66 patients received 60 Gy of irradiation to their head and neck cancer. Half of the patients received 5 mg oral pilocarpine 3 times a day from the beginning of radiotherapy over a period of 12 weeks. The control group received similar doses of pilocarpine only in the second 6 weeks following irradiation. Patient saliva secretion was recorded, and a visual analog scale measuring overall and daily xerostomia, difficulty in sleeping, speaking, eating and wearing dentures was employed. Results: Pilocarpine, given concomitantly with radiotherapy, statistically improved the salivary flow and induced better patient comfort by the end of radiotherapy. Patient comfort and symptoms related to xerostomia greatly decreased compared to patients receiving pilocarpine after irradiation in the second 6-week period of therapy. The patients' quality of life, saliva production and symptoms related to xerostomia showed significant progress by the end of the 12 weeks. Conclusion: The results suggest that stimulated salivary glands suffer less decrease in saliva production during radiotherapy. The stimulated saliva flow reduced the side-effects of irradiation.

KW - Head and neck cancer

KW - Pilocarpine chloratum

KW - Radiotherapy

KW - Salagen

KW - Squamous cell cancer

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645831385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645831385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 16619571

AN - SCOPUS:33645831385

VL - 26

SP - 1557

EP - 1562

JO - Anticancer Research

JF - Anticancer Research

SN - 0250-7005

IS - 2 B

ER -