A possible association between preterm birth and early periodontitis

Pilot study

Márta Radnai, István Gorzó, E. Nagy, E. Urbán, Tibor Novák, A. Pál

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

According to many studies, generalised periodontitis can be a risk factor for preterm birth (PB). A case-control study was carried out to examine if early localised periodontitis could be a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcome. Material and Methods: Postpartum women without any systemic disease were included into the study. Similar numbers of patients belonged to the case (41) and to the control (44) groups. A PB case was defined if a patient had a threatening premature labour during pregnancy, preterm premature rupture of membranes, or spontaneous preterm labour, and/or the weight of the newborn was ≤ 2499 g. Control women had delivery after the 37th gestational week and the newborn's weight was ≥ 2500 g. Known risk factors like smoking, alcohol, drug consumption, socio-economic status and the periodontal status were recorded. Results: A significant association was found between PB and early localised periodontitis of the patient with the following criterion having bleeding at ≥ 50% of the examined sites (6 at each tooth) and having at least at one site ≥ 4 mm probing depth (p = 0.001). The odds ratio was 5.46 at the 95% confidence interval. The average weight of the newborns in the periodontitis group was less than in the control group, the difference is significant (p = 0.047). Conclusion: The results indicate that early localised periodontitis of the patient during pregnancy can be regarded as an important risk factor for PB.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)736-741
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

Fingerprint

Periodontitis
Premature Birth
Premature Obstetric Labor
Newborn Infant
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy
Control Groups
Pregnancy Outcome
Alcohol Drinking
Postpartum Period
Case-Control Studies
Tooth
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Economics
Confidence Intervals
Hemorrhage
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Adverse effects
  • Newborn
  • Periodontal disease
  • Pregnancy
  • Preterm birth
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

A possible association between preterm birth and early periodontitis : Pilot study. / Radnai, Márta; Gorzó, István; Nagy, E.; Urbán, E.; Novák, Tibor; Pál, A.

In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Vol. 31, No. 9, 09.2004, p. 736-741.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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