A novel kynurenic acid analog (SZR104) inhibits pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptiform seizures. An electrophysiological study

Special issue related to Kynurenine

Ildikó Demeter, Károly Nagy, Levente Gellért, L. Vécsei, F. Fülöp, J. Toldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concentration of kynurenic acid (KYNA) in the cerebrospinal fluid, which is in the nanomolar range, is known to decrease in epilepsy. The experimental data suggest that treatment with l-KYN dose dependently increases the concentration of the neuroprotective KYNA in the brain, which itself hardly crosses the blood-brain barrier. However, it is suggested that new synthetic KYNA analogs may readily cross the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a new KYNA analog administered systemically in a sufficient dose results in a decreased population spike activity recorded from the pyramidal layer of area CA1 of the hippocampus, and also provides protection against pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptiform seizures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-154
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
Volume119
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Kynurenic Acid
Kynurenine
Pentylenetetrazole
Seizures
Blood-Brain Barrier
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Epilepsy
Hippocampus
Brain
Population

Keywords

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Epilepsy
  • Hippocampus
  • Neuroprotection
  • Pentylenetetrazole
  • Synthetic analog

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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AU - Nagy, Károly

AU - Gellért, Levente

AU - Vécsei, L.

AU - Fülöp, F.

AU - Toldi, J.

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