A model for determining the optimum histology of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To create and use a geometrical model for sentinel lymph node (SLN) histopathology in breast cancer. Methods: The model involves a spherical metastasis randomly situated in an SLN. Two extreme situations are taken as the starting points. In one of these, the metastasis is seen in its largest dimension, whereas in the other it is only just visible, approximating 0 mm in size. Intermediate positions are analysed, with different metastasis sizes and different distances between the levels assessed by histology. Results: The findings suggest that sections taken 1 mm apart afford a reasonable means of identifying almost all metastases measuring > 2 mm (referred to as macrometastases here). For nearly all micrometastases to be identified correctly according to the current TNM definitions (that is, metastases > 0.2 mm), a step sectioning protocol with levels of 250 μm or 200 μm would be adequate. Conclusions: SLNs are the most likely sites of nodal metastasis. Macrometastases are of recognised prognostic relevance so that all should be identified, preferably correctly as macrometastases; an assessment of levels 1 mm apart appears satisfactory and sufficient for this aim. SLNs also offer an ideal method for the study of the significance of micrometastases; for this, step sections separated by 200 or 250 μm are a good choice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-471
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2004

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Histology
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Micrometastasis
Sentinel Lymph Node

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

A model for determining the optimum histology of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer. / Cserni, G.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 57, No. 5, 05.2004, p. 467-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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