A historical overview of psychiatry in selected countries of Central & Eastern Europe

Pavel Mohr, Janos Füredi, Dave Swingler, I. Bitter, Mihai Dumitru Gheorghe, Ljubomir Hotujac, Marek Jarema, Marga Kocmur, Georgy Ivanov Koychev, Sergei N. Mosolov, Jan Pecenak, Janusz Rybakowski, Jaromir Svestka, Norman Sartorius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The paper reviews the history of psychiatry in several countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE): Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, and Slovenia. The first asylums for mentally ill in the region were founded in the 16th century (Poland). A German influence, impact of Russian psychiatrists, or French inspiration can be detected in some countries. The great tradition of psychiatry in this part of Europe is evidenced by the number of national psychiatric organizations and specialized journals. The development of psychiatry in CEE has in many ways reflected various historical twists. The nations of the region share a common past, an uneasy current period of transition from totalitarianism to democracy and the future as either novice or ascending members of the European Union.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-8
Number of pages6
JournalSocijalna Psihijatrija
Volume34
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

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Eastern Europe
Psychiatry
Poland
Democracy
Slovenia
Bulgaria
Romania
Slovakia
Croatia
Hungary
Czech Republic
Russia
Mentally Ill Persons
European Union
History
Organizations

Keywords

  • Historical aspects
  • Mental health
  • Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Mohr, P., Füredi, J., Swingler, D., Bitter, I., Gheorghe, M. D., Hotujac, L., ... Sartorius, N. (2006). A historical overview of psychiatry in selected countries of Central & Eastern Europe. Socijalna Psihijatrija, 34(1), 3-8.

A historical overview of psychiatry in selected countries of Central & Eastern Europe. / Mohr, Pavel; Füredi, Janos; Swingler, Dave; Bitter, I.; Gheorghe, Mihai Dumitru; Hotujac, Ljubomir; Jarema, Marek; Kocmur, Marga; Koychev, Georgy Ivanov; Mosolov, Sergei N.; Pecenak, Jan; Rybakowski, Janusz; Svestka, Jaromir; Sartorius, Norman.

In: Socijalna Psihijatrija, Vol. 34, No. 1, 03.2006, p. 3-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohr, P, Füredi, J, Swingler, D, Bitter, I, Gheorghe, MD, Hotujac, L, Jarema, M, Kocmur, M, Koychev, GI, Mosolov, SN, Pecenak, J, Rybakowski, J, Svestka, J & Sartorius, N 2006, 'A historical overview of psychiatry in selected countries of Central & Eastern Europe', Socijalna Psihijatrija, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 3-8.
Mohr P, Füredi J, Swingler D, Bitter I, Gheorghe MD, Hotujac L et al. A historical overview of psychiatry in selected countries of Central & Eastern Europe. Socijalna Psihijatrija. 2006 Mar;34(1):3-8.
Mohr, Pavel ; Füredi, Janos ; Swingler, Dave ; Bitter, I. ; Gheorghe, Mihai Dumitru ; Hotujac, Ljubomir ; Jarema, Marek ; Kocmur, Marga ; Koychev, Georgy Ivanov ; Mosolov, Sergei N. ; Pecenak, Jan ; Rybakowski, Janusz ; Svestka, Jaromir ; Sartorius, Norman. / A historical overview of psychiatry in selected countries of Central & Eastern Europe. In: Socijalna Psihijatrija. 2006 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 3-8.
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