A High-Intensity Multicomponent Agility Intervention Improves Parkinson Patients’ Clinical and Motor Symptoms

József Tollár, Ferenc Nagy, N. Kovács, Tibor Hortobágyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effects of a high-intensity exercise therapy using sensorimotor and visual stimuli on nondemented Parkinson disease (PD) patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance. Design: Randomized clinical intervention, using a before-after trial design. Setting: University hospital setting. Participants: A total of 72 PD patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2-3, of whom 64 were randomized, and 55 completed the study. Intervention: PD patients were randomly assigned to a no physical intervention control (n=20 of 29 completed, 9 withdrew before baseline testing) or to a high-intensity agility program (15 sessions, 3 weeks, n=35 completed). Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) motor experiences of daily living (M-EDL). Secondary outcomes were Beck Depression score, Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39), EuroQoL Five-Dimension (EQ5D) Questionnaire visual analog scale, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SE ADL) Scale, timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and 12 measures of static posturography. Results: The agility program improved MDS-UPDRS M-EDL by 38% compared with the 2% change in control (group by time interaction, P=.001). Only the intervention group improved in PDQ-39 (6.6 points), depression (18%), EQ5D visual analog scale score (15%), the SE ADL Scale score (15%), the TUG test (39%), and in 8 of 12 posturography measures by 42%-55% (all P<.001). The levodopa equivalent dosage did not change. Conclusion: A high-intensity agility program improved nondemented, stage 2-3 PD patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance by functionally meaningful margins at short-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Parkinson Disease
Movement Disorders
Activities of Daily Living
Visual Analog Scale
England
Exercise Therapy
Levodopa
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Gait
  • Posture
  • Quality of life
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

A High-Intensity Multicomponent Agility Intervention Improves Parkinson Patients’ Clinical and Motor Symptoms. / Tollár, József; Nagy, Ferenc; Kovács, N.; Hortobágyi, Tibor.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{290296c8f0c34c128422d28fb7ee1473,
title = "A High-Intensity Multicomponent Agility Intervention Improves Parkinson Patients’ Clinical and Motor Symptoms",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the effects of a high-intensity exercise therapy using sensorimotor and visual stimuli on nondemented Parkinson disease (PD) patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance. Design: Randomized clinical intervention, using a before-after trial design. Setting: University hospital setting. Participants: A total of 72 PD patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2-3, of whom 64 were randomized, and 55 completed the study. Intervention: PD patients were randomly assigned to a no physical intervention control (n=20 of 29 completed, 9 withdrew before baseline testing) or to a high-intensity agility program (15 sessions, 3 weeks, n=35 completed). Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) motor experiences of daily living (M-EDL). Secondary outcomes were Beck Depression score, Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39), EuroQoL Five-Dimension (EQ5D) Questionnaire visual analog scale, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SE ADL) Scale, timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and 12 measures of static posturography. Results: The agility program improved MDS-UPDRS M-EDL by 38{\%} compared with the 2{\%} change in control (group by time interaction, P=.001). Only the intervention group improved in PDQ-39 (6.6 points), depression (18{\%}), EQ5D visual analog scale score (15{\%}), the SE ADL Scale score (15{\%}), the TUG test (39{\%}), and in 8 of 12 posturography measures by 42{\%}-55{\%} (all P<.001). The levodopa equivalent dosage did not change. Conclusion: A high-intensity agility program improved nondemented, stage 2-3 PD patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance by functionally meaningful margins at short-term follow-up.",
keywords = "Gait, Posture, Quality of life, Rehabilitation",
author = "J{\'o}zsef Toll{\'a}r and Ferenc Nagy and N. Kov{\'a}cs and Tibor Hortob{\'a}gyi",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.apmr.2018.05.007",
language = "English",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0003-9993",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A High-Intensity Multicomponent Agility Intervention Improves Parkinson Patients’ Clinical and Motor Symptoms

AU - Tollár, József

AU - Nagy, Ferenc

AU - Kovács, N.

AU - Hortobágyi, Tibor

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objective: To determine the effects of a high-intensity exercise therapy using sensorimotor and visual stimuli on nondemented Parkinson disease (PD) patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance. Design: Randomized clinical intervention, using a before-after trial design. Setting: University hospital setting. Participants: A total of 72 PD patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2-3, of whom 64 were randomized, and 55 completed the study. Intervention: PD patients were randomly assigned to a no physical intervention control (n=20 of 29 completed, 9 withdrew before baseline testing) or to a high-intensity agility program (15 sessions, 3 weeks, n=35 completed). Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) motor experiences of daily living (M-EDL). Secondary outcomes were Beck Depression score, Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39), EuroQoL Five-Dimension (EQ5D) Questionnaire visual analog scale, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SE ADL) Scale, timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and 12 measures of static posturography. Results: The agility program improved MDS-UPDRS M-EDL by 38% compared with the 2% change in control (group by time interaction, P=.001). Only the intervention group improved in PDQ-39 (6.6 points), depression (18%), EQ5D visual analog scale score (15%), the SE ADL Scale score (15%), the TUG test (39%), and in 8 of 12 posturography measures by 42%-55% (all P<.001). The levodopa equivalent dosage did not change. Conclusion: A high-intensity agility program improved nondemented, stage 2-3 PD patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance by functionally meaningful margins at short-term follow-up.

AB - Objective: To determine the effects of a high-intensity exercise therapy using sensorimotor and visual stimuli on nondemented Parkinson disease (PD) patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance. Design: Randomized clinical intervention, using a before-after trial design. Setting: University hospital setting. Participants: A total of 72 PD patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2-3, of whom 64 were randomized, and 55 completed the study. Intervention: PD patients were randomly assigned to a no physical intervention control (n=20 of 29 completed, 9 withdrew before baseline testing) or to a high-intensity agility program (15 sessions, 3 weeks, n=35 completed). Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) motor experiences of daily living (M-EDL). Secondary outcomes were Beck Depression score, Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39), EuroQoL Five-Dimension (EQ5D) Questionnaire visual analog scale, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SE ADL) Scale, timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and 12 measures of static posturography. Results: The agility program improved MDS-UPDRS M-EDL by 38% compared with the 2% change in control (group by time interaction, P=.001). Only the intervention group improved in PDQ-39 (6.6 points), depression (18%), EQ5D visual analog scale score (15%), the SE ADL Scale score (15%), the TUG test (39%), and in 8 of 12 posturography measures by 42%-55% (all P<.001). The levodopa equivalent dosage did not change. Conclusion: A high-intensity agility program improved nondemented, stage 2-3 PD patients’ clinical symptoms, mobility, and standing balance by functionally meaningful margins at short-term follow-up.

KW - Gait

KW - Posture

KW - Quality of life

KW - Rehabilitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051370084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85051370084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.05.007

DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.05.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 29886075

AN - SCOPUS:85051370084

JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

ER -