A computational study of physical and biological characterization of common UV sources and filters, and their relevance for substituting sunlight

P. Gróf, G. Rontó, Evelyne Sage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sunlight is the most important environmental UV source, affecting not only human health but also the whole terrestrial ecosystem. The use of artificial sources is advantageous since it is independent of geographical location and seasonal variations, however, in some photobiological /photochemical studies the choice of a specific UV source in relation to the biological end-point studied is sometimes questionable. Furthermore, it is often difficult to compare the results obtained in different laboratories due to 'slight' differences in the physical characteristics of the UV sources used. In an attempt to address these issues we calculated and compared the physical characteristics and the biological efficiency in UV-B and UV-A regions for two biological end-points (CPD and Fpg-sensitive sites formation) for frequently used UV-B, UV-A sources and solar light simulators (SLS). Our calculation shows that FS20 lamp is appropriate for studying the biological effects of UV-B radiation although differences in spectral characteristics of the associated filters may lead to at least 2-fold yields in CPD production. Furthermore, the use of a SLS with a Kodacel filter alone is inadequate for studying environmental UV effects. A metal-halide source with a Schott WG345 filter is appropriate for studies on biological effects due to UV-A region. Relative exposure duration was calculated to achieve equal amount of CPD or Fpg-sensitives sites, provided equal, total UV-(A+B) irradiance for the different UV sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-59
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Photochemistry and Photobiology, B: Biology
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2002

Fingerprint

Sunlight
sunlight
ultraviolet radiation
solar radiation
Simulators
Metal halides
filters
Light
Electric lamps
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
halides
Metals
Health
Geographical Locations
Radiation
biological effects
exposure duration
human health
simulators

Keywords

  • Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers
  • Sunlight
  • Ultraviolet radiation
  • UVA
  • UVB

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Bioengineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Sunlight is the most important environmental UV source, affecting not only human health but also the whole terrestrial ecosystem. The use of artificial sources is advantageous since it is independent of geographical location and seasonal variations, however, in some photobiological /photochemical studies the choice of a specific UV source in relation to the biological end-point studied is sometimes questionable. Furthermore, it is often difficult to compare the results obtained in different laboratories due to 'slight' differences in the physical characteristics of the UV sources used. In an attempt to address these issues we calculated and compared the physical characteristics and the biological efficiency in UV-B and UV-A regions for two biological end-points (CPD and Fpg-sensitive sites formation) for frequently used UV-B, UV-A sources and solar light simulators (SLS). Our calculation shows that FS20 lamp is appropriate for studying the biological effects of UV-B radiation although differences in spectral characteristics of the associated filters may lead to at least 2-fold yields in CPD production. Furthermore, the use of a SLS with a Kodacel filter alone is inadequate for studying environmental UV effects. A metal-halide source with a Schott WG345 filter is appropriate for studies on biological effects due to UV-A region. Relative exposure duration was calculated to achieve equal amount of CPD or Fpg-sensitives sites, provided equal, total UV-(A+B) irradiance for the different UV sources.",
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