A comparison of omeprazole with ranitidine for ulcers associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

Neville D. Yeomans, Z. Tulassay, László Juhász, I. Rácz, John M. Howard, Christoffel J. Van Rensburg, Anthony J. Swannell, Christopher J. Hawkey

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Abstract

Background: Suppressing acid secretion is thought to reduce the risk of ulcers associated with regular use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but the best means of accomplishing this is uncertain. Methods: We studied 541 patients who required continuous treatment with NSAIDs and who had ulcers or more than 10 erosions in either the stomach or duodenum. Patients were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with omeprazole, 20 mg or 40 mg orally per day, or renitidine, 150 mg orally twice a day, for four or eight weeks, depending on when treatment was successful (defined as the resolution of ulcer and the presence of fewer then five erosions in the stomach and fewer than five erosions in the duodenum, and not more then mild dyspepsia). We randomly assigned 432 patients in whom treatment was successful to maintenance treatment with either 20 mg of omeprazole per day or 150 mg of ranitidine twice a day for six months. Results: At eight weeks, treatment was successful in 80 percent (140 of 174) of the patients in the group given 20 mg of omeprazole per day, 79 percent (148 of 187) of those given 40 mg of omeprazole per day, and 63 percent (110 of 174) of those given ranitidine (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-726
Number of pages8
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume338
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 12 1998

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Ranitidine
Omeprazole
Ulcer
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Duodenum
Stomach
Therapeutics
Dyspepsia
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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A comparison of omeprazole with ranitidine for ulcers associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. / Yeomans, Neville D.; Tulassay, Z.; Juhász, László; Rácz, I.; Howard, John M.; Van Rensburg, Christoffel J.; Swannell, Anthony J.; Hawkey, Christopher J.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 338, No. 11, 12.03.1998, p. 719-726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yeomans, Neville D. ; Tulassay, Z. ; Juhász, László ; Rácz, I. ; Howard, John M. ; Van Rensburg, Christoffel J. ; Swannell, Anthony J. ; Hawkey, Christopher J. / A comparison of omeprazole with ranitidine for ulcers associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 338, No. 11. pp. 719-726.
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