A coagulation factor becomes useful in the study of acute leukemias: Studies with blood coagulation factor XIII

Flóra Kiss, A. Simon, László Csáthy, Zsuzsanna Hevessy, E. Katona, C. Kiss, J. Kappelmayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intracellular form of the coagulation factor XIII has previously been identified by immunomorphological techniques using polyclonal antibodies. In these studies, only the A subunit (FXIII-A) was detectable in megakaryocytes/platelets and in monocytes/macrophages. We developed several novel monoclonal antibody clones directed to both subunits (FXIII-A and FXIII-B) and investigated their appearance in normal and leukemic cells. By using 3- and 4-color flow cytometry FXIII expression was investigated in normal peripheral blood and bone marrow samples and in acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia cases. Samples were studied by Western blotting and confocal laser scanning microscopy. With a previously published ELISA assay applying two monoclonal antibodies directed to different epitopes in FXIII-A, we were able to measure the intracytoplasmic content of FXIII-A in normal cells and leukemic blasts. FXIII-A was detectable in normal peripheral blood monocytes and in large quantities in platelets, but both cell types were negative for FXIII-B. There was no surface staining for FXIII-A, it only appeared intracellularly. In samples derived from patients with AML M4 and M5, FXIII-A sensitively identified blast cells. Although normal lymphocytes do not express FXIII-A, 40% of ALL cases showed significant FXIII-A expression as determined by flow cytometry. FXIII-A positivity of lymphoblasts was verified by Western blotting, ELISA, and confocal laser scanning microscopy cytometry. These data provide evidence that FXIII-A is a sufficiently sensitive marker in differentiating myeloblasts and monoblasts and is suitable for identifying leukemia-associated phenotypes in ALL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-201
Number of pages8
JournalCytometry Part A
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Factor XIII
Blood Coagulation Factors
Leukemia
Confocal Microscopy
Monocytes
Flow Cytometry
Blood Platelets
Laser Scanning Cytometry
Monocyte-Macrophage Precursor Cells
Western Blotting
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Monoclonal Antibodies
Granulocyte Precursor Cells
Megakaryocytes
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Epitopes
Clone Cells
Color
Bone Marrow

Keywords

  • Acute leukemia phenotype
  • Factor XIII
  • Flow cytometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Biophysics
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

A coagulation factor becomes useful in the study of acute leukemias : Studies with blood coagulation factor XIII. / Kiss, Flóra; Simon, A.; Csáthy, László; Hevessy, Zsuzsanna; Katona, E.; Kiss, C.; Kappelmayer, J.

In: Cytometry Part A, Vol. 73, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 194-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ba218ec9dcc2497f8c24c6daeda550d9,
title = "A coagulation factor becomes useful in the study of acute leukemias: Studies with blood coagulation factor XIII",
abstract = "The intracellular form of the coagulation factor XIII has previously been identified by immunomorphological techniques using polyclonal antibodies. In these studies, only the A subunit (FXIII-A) was detectable in megakaryocytes/platelets and in monocytes/macrophages. We developed several novel monoclonal antibody clones directed to both subunits (FXIII-A and FXIII-B) and investigated their appearance in normal and leukemic cells. By using 3- and 4-color flow cytometry FXIII expression was investigated in normal peripheral blood and bone marrow samples and in acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia cases. Samples were studied by Western blotting and confocal laser scanning microscopy. With a previously published ELISA assay applying two monoclonal antibodies directed to different epitopes in FXIII-A, we were able to measure the intracytoplasmic content of FXIII-A in normal cells and leukemic blasts. FXIII-A was detectable in normal peripheral blood monocytes and in large quantities in platelets, but both cell types were negative for FXIII-B. There was no surface staining for FXIII-A, it only appeared intracellularly. In samples derived from patients with AML M4 and M5, FXIII-A sensitively identified blast cells. Although normal lymphocytes do not express FXIII-A, 40{\%} of ALL cases showed significant FXIII-A expression as determined by flow cytometry. FXIII-A positivity of lymphoblasts was verified by Western blotting, ELISA, and confocal laser scanning microscopy cytometry. These data provide evidence that FXIII-A is a sufficiently sensitive marker in differentiating myeloblasts and monoblasts and is suitable for identifying leukemia-associated phenotypes in ALL.",
keywords = "Acute leukemia phenotype, Factor XIII, Flow cytometry",
author = "Fl{\'o}ra Kiss and A. Simon and L{\'a}szl{\'o} Cs{\'a}thy and Zsuzsanna Hevessy and E. Katona and C. Kiss and J. Kappelmayer",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1002/cyto.a.20485",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "194--201",
journal = "Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology",
issn = "1552-4922",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A coagulation factor becomes useful in the study of acute leukemias

T2 - Studies with blood coagulation factor XIII

AU - Kiss, Flóra

AU - Simon, A.

AU - Csáthy, László

AU - Hevessy, Zsuzsanna

AU - Katona, E.

AU - Kiss, C.

AU - Kappelmayer, J.

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - The intracellular form of the coagulation factor XIII has previously been identified by immunomorphological techniques using polyclonal antibodies. In these studies, only the A subunit (FXIII-A) was detectable in megakaryocytes/platelets and in monocytes/macrophages. We developed several novel monoclonal antibody clones directed to both subunits (FXIII-A and FXIII-B) and investigated their appearance in normal and leukemic cells. By using 3- and 4-color flow cytometry FXIII expression was investigated in normal peripheral blood and bone marrow samples and in acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia cases. Samples were studied by Western blotting and confocal laser scanning microscopy. With a previously published ELISA assay applying two monoclonal antibodies directed to different epitopes in FXIII-A, we were able to measure the intracytoplasmic content of FXIII-A in normal cells and leukemic blasts. FXIII-A was detectable in normal peripheral blood monocytes and in large quantities in platelets, but both cell types were negative for FXIII-B. There was no surface staining for FXIII-A, it only appeared intracellularly. In samples derived from patients with AML M4 and M5, FXIII-A sensitively identified blast cells. Although normal lymphocytes do not express FXIII-A, 40% of ALL cases showed significant FXIII-A expression as determined by flow cytometry. FXIII-A positivity of lymphoblasts was verified by Western blotting, ELISA, and confocal laser scanning microscopy cytometry. These data provide evidence that FXIII-A is a sufficiently sensitive marker in differentiating myeloblasts and monoblasts and is suitable for identifying leukemia-associated phenotypes in ALL.

AB - The intracellular form of the coagulation factor XIII has previously been identified by immunomorphological techniques using polyclonal antibodies. In these studies, only the A subunit (FXIII-A) was detectable in megakaryocytes/platelets and in monocytes/macrophages. We developed several novel monoclonal antibody clones directed to both subunits (FXIII-A and FXIII-B) and investigated their appearance in normal and leukemic cells. By using 3- and 4-color flow cytometry FXIII expression was investigated in normal peripheral blood and bone marrow samples and in acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia cases. Samples were studied by Western blotting and confocal laser scanning microscopy. With a previously published ELISA assay applying two monoclonal antibodies directed to different epitopes in FXIII-A, we were able to measure the intracytoplasmic content of FXIII-A in normal cells and leukemic blasts. FXIII-A was detectable in normal peripheral blood monocytes and in large quantities in platelets, but both cell types were negative for FXIII-B. There was no surface staining for FXIII-A, it only appeared intracellularly. In samples derived from patients with AML M4 and M5, FXIII-A sensitively identified blast cells. Although normal lymphocytes do not express FXIII-A, 40% of ALL cases showed significant FXIII-A expression as determined by flow cytometry. FXIII-A positivity of lymphoblasts was verified by Western blotting, ELISA, and confocal laser scanning microscopy cytometry. These data provide evidence that FXIII-A is a sufficiently sensitive marker in differentiating myeloblasts and monoblasts and is suitable for identifying leukemia-associated phenotypes in ALL.

KW - Acute leukemia phenotype

KW - Factor XIII

KW - Flow cytometry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=40049098963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=40049098963&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cyto.a.20485

DO - 10.1002/cyto.a.20485

M3 - Article

C2 - 18000871

AN - SCOPUS:40049098963

VL - 73

SP - 194

EP - 201

JO - Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology

JF - Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology

SN - 1552-4922

IS - 3

ER -