5,000 years old Egyptian iron beads made from hammered meteoritic iron

Thilo Rehren, T. Belgya, Albert Jambon, György Káli, Z. Kasztovszky, Zoltán Kis, Imre Kovács, Boglárka Maróti, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Gianluca Miniaci, Vincent C. Pigott, Miljana Radivojević, L. Rosta, L. Szentmiklósi, Zoltán Szokefalvi-Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The earliest known iron artefacts are nine small beads securely dated to circa 3200 BC, from two burials in Gerzeh, northern Egypt. We show that these beads were made from meteoritic iron, and shaped by careful hammering the metal into thin sheets before rolling them into tubes. The study demonstrates the ability of neutron and X-ray methods to determine the nature of the material even after complete corrosion of the iron metal. The iron beads were strung into a necklace together with other exotic minerals such as lapis lazuli, gold and carnelian, revealing the status of meteoritic iron as a special material on a par with precious metal and gem stones. The results confirm that already in the fourth millennium BC metalworkers had mastered the smithing of meteoritic iron, an iron-nickel alloy much harder and more brittle than the more commonly worked copper. This is of wider significance as it demonstrates that metalworkers had already nearly two millennia of experience to hot-work meteoritic iron when iron smelting was introduced. This knowledge was essential for the development of iron smelting, which produced metal in a solid state process and hence depended on this ability in order to replace copper and bronze as the main utilitarian metals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4785-4792
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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gold
Egypt
funeral
artifact
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Iron
Beads
Egyptians
Metals
Copper
Millennium
Iron Smelting
Metalworkers

Keywords

  • Beads
  • Egypt
  • Meteoritic iron
  • Neutron methods
  • X-ray methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

Cite this

5,000 years old Egyptian iron beads made from hammered meteoritic iron. / Rehren, Thilo; Belgya, T.; Jambon, Albert; Káli, György; Kasztovszky, Z.; Kis, Zoltán; Kovács, Imre; Maróti, Boglárka; Martinón-Torres, Marcos; Miniaci, Gianluca; Pigott, Vincent C.; Radivojević, Miljana; Rosta, L.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Szokefalvi-Nagy, Zoltán.

In: Journal of Archaeological Science, Vol. 40, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 4785-4792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rehren, T, Belgya, T, Jambon, A, Káli, G, Kasztovszky, Z, Kis, Z, Kovács, I, Maróti, B, Martinón-Torres, M, Miniaci, G, Pigott, VC, Radivojević, M, Rosta, L, Szentmiklósi, L & Szokefalvi-Nagy, Z 2013, '5,000 years old Egyptian iron beads made from hammered meteoritic iron', Journal of Archaeological Science, vol. 40, no. 12, pp. 4785-4792. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2013.06.002
Rehren, Thilo ; Belgya, T. ; Jambon, Albert ; Káli, György ; Kasztovszky, Z. ; Kis, Zoltán ; Kovács, Imre ; Maróti, Boglárka ; Martinón-Torres, Marcos ; Miniaci, Gianluca ; Pigott, Vincent C. ; Radivojević, Miljana ; Rosta, L. ; Szentmiklósi, L. ; Szokefalvi-Nagy, Zoltán. / 5,000 years old Egyptian iron beads made from hammered meteoritic iron. In: Journal of Archaeological Science. 2013 ; Vol. 40, No. 12. pp. 4785-4792.
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